Posts with the category “science”

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Do You Really Just Need 8 Glasses Of Water A Day?
July 11th, 2019
Do You Really Just Need 8 Glasses Of Water A Day? Almost everyone’s heard of the 8×8 rule. Specifically, it states that one needs to drink eight 8-ounce glasses of water every day in order to take in ...  Read More
by James Koroma
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Neanderthals Resorted to Cannibalism in the Face of Climate Change
March 29th, 2019
Neanderthals Resorted to Cannibalism in the Face of Climate Change We know that Neanderthals were carnivores, with a diet that consisted primarily—if not exclusively—of meat. But a new study by resear...  Read More
by James Koroma
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How Volcanoes Can Trigger Tsunamis
December 23rd, 2018
How Volcanoes Can Trigger Tsunamis Nobody had any clue. There was certainly no warning. It's part of the picture that now suggests a sudden failure in the west-southwest flank of the Anak Krakatau vol...  Read More
by James Koroma
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Even The Remains Of Dodo Birds Are Hard To Find
November 27th, 2018
Even The Remains Of Dodo Birds Are Hard To Find There is perhaps no animal more emblematic for the perils of extinction at the hands of human interference than that of the dodo bird. Native only to th...  Read More
by James Koroma
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A.I. Can Help Us Understand The Roots Of Religious Violence
November 2nd, 2018
A.I. Can Help Us Understand The Roots Of Religious Violence Religion is often said to be at the root of the world’s conflicts, but what if mankind were simply naturally violent? How might we begin to ...  Read More
by James Koroma
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World's longest sea crossing Hong Kong-Zhuhai bridge opens
October 22nd, 2018
World's longest sea crossing Hong Kong-Zhuhai bridge opens Chinese President Xi Jinping has officially opened the world's longest sea crossing bridge, nine years after construction first began. Includ...  Read More
by James Koroma
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Nobel prize for landmark cancer therapy
October 1st, 2018
Nobel prize for landmark cancer therapy Two scientists who discovered how to fight cancer using the body's immune system have won the 2018 Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine. The work, by Professo...  Read More
by James Koroma
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Why Nordic countries might not be as happy as you think
August 25th, 2018
Why Nordic countries might not be as happy as you think Nordic countries like Finland and Norway may regularly come out on top of world happiness indexes for wellbeing year-on-year - but new research ...  Read More
by James Koroma
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Ancient Egyptians Were Making Mummies Much Earlier Than Thought
August 17th, 2018
Ancient Egyptians Were Making Mummies Much Earlier Than Thought By the time pharaohs like King Tut ruled Egypt, mummification was a codified practice that had started in the Old Kingdom period around ...  Read More
by James Koroma
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Sleep deprivation fuels loneliness because tired people are socially repellent, say scientists
August 14th, 2018
Sleep deprivation fuels loneliness because tired people are socially repellent, say scientists   Sleep deprivation is fuelling the loneliness epidemic because overly-tired people are less sociable, a ...  Read More
by James Koroma
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Lemur extinction: Vast majority of species under threat
August 2nd, 2018
Lemur extinction: Vast majority of species under threat Almost every species of lemur, wide-eyed primates unique to Madagascar, is under threat of extinction. That is the conclusion of an internationa...  Read More
by James Koroma
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New drug for recurring malaria
July 23rd, 2018
New drug for recurring malaria A new drug to treat malaria has been given the green light by authorities in the United States. The medicine is specifically for the recurring form of malaria - caused b...  Read More
by James Koroma
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Stonehenge builders used Pythagoras' theorem 2,000 years before his birth
June 20th, 2018
Stonehenge builders used Pythagoras' theorem 2,000 years before his birth The builders of Britain’s ancient stone circles like Stonehenge were using Pythagoras' theorem 2,000 years before the Greek ph...  Read More
by James Koroma
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The Many Off-The-Grid Benefits Of Baking Soda
June 5th, 2018
The Many Off-The-Grid Benefits Of Baking Soda Baking soda is unusual in that it’s inorganic. That just means that you cannot produce baking soda from anything that was ever living. Household odors con...  Read More
by James Koroma
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Clan Wars Blamed for Mysterious Ancient Collapse of the Male Chromosome
May 31st, 2018
Clan Wars Blamed for Mysterious Ancient Collapse of the Male Chromosome About 5,000 to 7,000 years ago the number of men having children fell dramatically—possibly by as much as 95 percent—throughout ...  Read More
by James Koroma
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The First Birth Control Pill Used Puerto Rican Women as Guinea Pigs
May 9th, 2018
The First Birth Control Pill Used Puerto Rican Women as Guinea Pigs It came in a brown bottle, marketed as a safe way for married women to treat menstrual disorders. But the contents of that little br...  Read More
by James Koroma
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Baldness cure could come from side-effect of cancer drug
May 8th, 2018
Baldness cure could come from side-effect of cancer drug  A cure for baldness could be on the horizon after British scientists discovered that an osteoporosis drug stimulates hair growth three times q...  Read More
by James Koroma
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Iowa approves most restrictive abortion bill in U.S.
May 2nd, 2018
Iowa approves most restrictive abortion bill in U.S. The US state of Iowa has approved an abortion law banning most abortions once a foetal heartbeat is detected. Republican lawmakers passed the bill ...  Read More
by James Koroma
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Remembering the Prince of Mathematicians: Johann Carl Friedrich Gauss
April 30th, 2018
Remembering the Prince of Mathematicians: Johann Carl Friedrich Gauss Born 241 years ago on April 30, Johann Carl Friedrich Gauss is often described as the "Prince of Mathematicians" and hailed for hi...  Read More
by James Koroma
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Can We Stop a Mass Extinction of Human Languages?
April 26th, 2018
Can We Stop a Mass Extinction of Human Languages?                     There are more than 7,000 languages on Earth, yet half of the world’s 7.6 billion people speak just 24 of them and 95 percent spea...  Read More
by James Koroma
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5 Weird Stories from the History of Embalming
April 23rd, 2018
5 Weird Stories from the History of Embalming More than 5,000 years ago the Ancient Egyptians developed the first embalming rituals to preserve lost loved ones. But, let’s get real. Mummies may last a...  Read More
by James Koroma
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Thomas Edison Did Not Invent The Light Bulb
April 19th, 2018
Thomas Edison Did Not Invent The Light Bulb Who Invented the Light Bulb“Well, that is a complicated question,” says Leonard DeGraaf, archivist at the Thomas Edison National Historic Park in New Jer...  Read More
by James Koroma
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Sugary Drink Consumption Dropped 40 Percent in Philadelphia Due to Beverage Tax
April 13th, 2018
Sugary Drink Consumption Dropped 40 Percent in Philadelphia Due to Beverage Tax When Philadelphia adopted a tax on Coca Cola, Pepsi, Gatorade and other sugary drinks two years ago, boosters said one o...  Read More
by James Koroma
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The World's Smallest Computer Is the Size of a Grain of Salt
April 3rd, 2018
The World's Smallest Computer Is the Size of a Grain of Salt A computer as big as a grain of salt could transform shipping that crisscrosses the planet, said IBM researchers who recently unveiled the ...  Read More
by James Koroma
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Lost Villages of the Amazon May Have Housed Up to 1 Million Before Colonization
March 30th, 2018
Lost Villages of the Amazon May Have Housed Up to 1 Million Before Colonization Up to a million people may have lived in a part of the southern Amazon basin in the centuries before European colonizati...  Read More
by James Koroma
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Bumpy labels that signal when food has gone off are set to be introduced for dairy products
March 18th, 2018
Bumpy labels that signal when food has gone off are set to be introduced for dairy products  High tech food labels that turn 'bumpy' when products have gone off are set to be introduced by a dairy com...  Read More
by James Koroma
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DNA Reveals Stone Age North Africans Had Near Eastern and Sub-Saharan Ancestors
March 16th, 2018
DNA Reveals Stone Age North Africans Had Near Eastern and Sub-Saharan Ancestors The oldest nuclear DNA ever recovered in Africa shows that people who lived in what is now Morocco 15,000 years ago were...  Read More
by James Koroma
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7 Things You Didn’t Know About Stephen Hawking
March 14th, 2018
7 Things You Didn’t Know About Stephen Hawking Renowned physicist Stephen Hawking died on March 14, 2018—also known as Pi Day—at age 76. The scientist stands out for his significant contributions to t...  Read More
by James Koroma
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How To Make Pancake Syrup From Birch Trees
March 13th, 2018
How To Make Pancake Syrup From Birch Trees Birch syrup is an alternative to maple syrup that is commonly grown across the northern United States, Canada and in northern Europe. While other birch produ...  Read More
by James Koroma
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Cheese Before Bed Will Not Give You Nightmares
March 1st, 2018
Cheese Before Bed Will Not Give You Nightmares Have you ever been chided in the twilight hours of consciousness for opening the cold fridge in a quest for late night dairy delicacies? If so, you have ...  Read More
by James Koroma
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Dark Matter May Have Kept the Early Universe Cool
February 28th, 2018
Dark Matter May Have Kept the Early Universe Cool Astronomers have used a small radio telescope to find faint radio waves emitted by clouds of primordial hydrogen gas formed just 180 million years aft...  Read More
by James Koroma
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Ancient Britons replaced by newcomers
February 21st, 2018
Ancient Britons replaced by newcomers The ancient population of Britain was almost completely replaced by newcomers about 4,500 years ago, a study shows.The findings mean modern Britons trace just a s...  Read More
by James Koroma
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A Brain Museum in Connecticut Features A Steak Signed By Pavlov
February 20th, 2018
A Brain Museum in Connecticut Features A Steak Signed By Pavlov Many people enjoy signing their names on things to leave their mark. Nearly 100 years ago, Ivan Pavlov autographed a piece of steak usin...  Read More
by James Koroma
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Water Quality Map Highlights Trouble Area
February 16th, 2018
Water Quality Map Highlights Trouble Area The good news: American drinking water is mostly fine. But there are some pockets where water systems are racking up repeated violations of health standards a...  Read More
by James Koroma
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First human eggs grown in laboratory
February 9th, 2018
First human eggs grown in laboratory Human eggs have been grown in the laboratory for the first time, say researchers at the University of Edinburgh. The team say the technique could lead to new ways ...  Read More
by James Koroma
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New Research Reveals Britain's Oldest Ancestor Had Dark Skin and Blue Eyes
February 7th, 2018
New Research Reveals Britain’s Oldest Ancestor Had Dark Skin and Blue Eyes The 10,000-year-old skeleton of “Cheddar Man,” the oldest complete skeleton found in Britain, recently became a bit less myst...  Read More
by James Koroma
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Breaking the Code of the Mysterious 15th-Century Voynich Manuscript
February 6th, 2018
Breaking the Code of the Mysterious 15th-Century Voynich Manuscript In 1639, Georg Baresch, an alchemist from Prague, revealed to the world a mystery that was recently dated to have existed as far bac...  Read More
by James Koroma
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Study suggests anxious people more likely to be bitten by dogs
February 1st, 2018
Study suggests anxious people more likely to be bitten by dogs Jittery postal workers who tentatively approach homes worried they could be bitten by the resident dog, may be inviting an attack, a new ...  Read More
by James Koroma
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China Plans to Build the World's Largest Steerable Radio Telescope
January 24th, 2018
China Plans to Build the World's Largest Steerable Radio Telescope China has announced plans to build the largest steerable radio telescope in the world, the Xinjiang Qitai 110-meter Radio Telescope (...  Read More
by James Koroma
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The Criminalization of Abortion Began as a Business Tactic
January 22nd, 2018
The Criminalization of Abortion Began as a Business Tactic If you opened up the Leavenworth Times, a Kansas newspaper, in the 1850s, you’d see an ad for Sir James Clarke’s Female Pills. These pills, t...  Read More
by James Koroma